Pesce Law Group, P.C.

FREE CONSULTATIONS 630-352-2240

Naperville | Oak Brook | Burr Ridge | Lake Forest | St. Charles

Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in alimony

b2ap3_thumbnail_gavel-money-alimony-maintenance.jpgDepending upon the circumstances surrounding your marriage and divorce, you may feel that you should be entitled to spousal maintenance payments from your ex-spouse. Unlike child support, spousal support is not presumed to be appropriate in every situation. Instead, Illinois law requires each case to be weighed on its own merits to determine if the need for such supports actually exists. This means that, if you think you deserve to receive maintenance, you may need to explicitly request consideration for it.

Marital Misconduct Not a Factor

Unless you and your spouse included behavior clauses in a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement, the court will not consider the conduct of either party when deciding whether to award maintenance. While your spouse’s behavior may leave you feeling like he or she owes you some type of restitution, the law in Illinois specifically prohibits marital misconduct from being a factor in maintenance proceedings. Spousal support is meant to help you meet your financial needs and obligations. It is not intended to be used as a punitive measure against your spouse.

Decreased Earning Potential

While the law does not allow support to be awarded on the basis of infidelity or marital misconduct, other factors in your relationship can affect the proceedings in your favor. If your role in the marriage or as a parent has impaired your ability to reach your full earning potential, your chances of being awarded of support may be better.

...

Naperville Family Law Firm

If you were a stay-at-home mom or dad during your marriage, and your spouse was the primary source of family income, divorce can present a unique set of challenges. Stay-at-home parents frequently forego education and career opportunities for years and even decades so they can raise children and take care of daily household duties. After a divorce, these parents find themselves re-entering the job market, many with little-to-no work experience and substantial gaps in employment.

Although spousal maintenance (formerly called spousal support or alimony in Illinois) is an option, is it something a divorced stay-at-home parent can expect?

...

Naperville divorce attorneysThere has always been some confusion regarding spousal maintenance or alimony. Each state has its own rules and procedures for determining who should get spousal support and how much payments should be. However, one rule which is, for now, the same across the country is how maintenance payments are taxed. For the last 75 years, maintenance or support payments have been deductible for the payer. The recipient of the support is responsible for paying income tax on the funds. After Dec. 31, 2018, this will no longer be the case.

Maintenance Payments No Longer Deductible

Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, spousal maintenance will no longer be deductible for the payer, and taxes will not need to be paid on it by the recipient. This could mean that those who get divorced in 2019 may be paying a much higher amount in spousal support than those who get divorced in 2018. Because spousal maintenance is paid by the spouse with a higher income to the spouse with a lower income, it made sense to place the tax burden on the person receiving funds. The lower-earning spouse generally has a lower tax rate than the higher-earning spouse.

...
Back to Top